Photography

The stunning images taken by an airline captain of earth’s mega-cities illuminated like an electricity grid at night

Incredible aerial shots show mega-cities of the world illuminated like an electric grid by a British airline pilot who has travelled the equivalent of ten round trips to the moon.

Taken from the flight deck, the stunning photos show some of the most recognisable places in the world from an-above earthly perspective.

Dubai, Bangkok,  are among the collection of images outlined in bright orange, blue, green and white lights.

 

This shows the Palm of Dubai from the skies, the circular development extending into the seas of the UAE country

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West Bay in Qatar looks mesmerising from above in one of pilot Jon Bowles’ spectacular photos from above

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This photo shows Dubai at night, with the Burj Khalifa clearly visible along its skyline, populated by tall buildings

This photo shows Dubai at night, with the Burj Khalifa clearly visible along its skyline, populated by tall buildings

Captain Jon Bowles, 55, from Bolton, UK, has amassed these jaw-dropping pictures over the past five years during night-flights that span the globe. A seasoned pilot, Jon Bowles has racked up an astounding five million air miles during his 36-year career as a pilot.

‘I look for shapes in the cities, light areas, dark areas and patterns in the way the city is laid out,’ said Jon. ‘Older cities tend to radiate out of the centre, with ring roads and spokes running into the centre.

‘These older cities sometimes look like huge fluorescent growths on the countryside, with tendrils spreading out from the nucleus.

 

As well as the cities below, the flight deck of the Boeing 777 is lit up, but it doesn't detract from the views outside

As well as the cities below, the flight deck of the Boeing 777 is lit up, but it doesn’t detract from the views outside

Kuwait is heavily orange in this stunning photo shot at night as a Boeing 777 soars above the Middle Eastern country
Kuwait is heavily orange in this stunning photo shot at night as a Boeing 777 soars above the Middle Eastern country

The vibrancy of Bangkok is clear to see in this picture. It’s proof that despite shooting from behind glass, beauty can still be captured

The vibrancy of Bangkok is clear to see in this picture. It's proof that despite shooting from behind glass, beauty can still be captured

An aerial view of Budapest, Hungary. The incredible aerial shots show mega-cities of the world illuminated like an electric grid

An aerial view of Budapest, Hungary. The incredible aerial shots show mega-cities of the world illuminated like an electric grid

With a perfect contrast of lights and electricity, and mountains, this is a view of the city of Sandanaj, Iran

With a perfect contrast of lights and electricity, and mountains, this is a view of the city of Sandanaj, Iran

Captain Jon Bowles, 55, from Bolton, UK, has amassed these jaw-dropping pictures over the past five years during night-flights

Turbulence makes photography impractical, so I only shoot in still air.

‘I love how different the world looks at night. I especially enjoy flying at night with no moon and a sky full of stars.

‘I love seeing storms flickering in the distance, remote settlements sparkling in the desert, seeing the aurora when it’s active. I also like the lights of cities from above. One of the things I love most about flying, whether by day or night, is how it puts things in perspective.

Captain Jon Bowles, 55, from Bolton, UK

Captain Jon Bowles, 55, from Bolton, UK

 

Cairo, Egypt. The photographer says he aims to show ‘the footprint of the human race on planet Earth’

Cairo, Egypt. The photographer says he aims to show 'the footprint of the human race on planet Earth'

Buenos Aires under cloud cover. Jon Bowles says that by flying in light, things around the world are ‘put into perspective’

Buenos Aires under cloud cover. Jon Bowles says that by flying in light, things around the world are 'put into perspective'

Via: dailymail.co.uk

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